Criminal Law: A Brief Summary Of What You Need To Know

Criminal law is a particular specialization that deals with criminal acts. It is important to understand the different details that constitute criminal law and the consequences of not following it properly.

What is Criminal Law?

Criminal law is a branch of the law that deals with crimes. Crimes are acts that are considered to be harmful to society as a whole and are punishable by law. Criminal law includes both the punishment for these crimes and the rehabilitation of the offender.

Criminal law is divided into two main categories: felonies and misdemeanors. Felonies are more serious crimes, such as murder, rape, and robbery. While misdemeanors are less serious offenses, such as petty theft or trespassing.

Punishments for crimes can vary depending on the severity of the offense. For example, someone convicted of a misdemeanor may only receive a fine or probation, while someone convicted of a felony may be sentenced to time in prison.

In addition to punishment, criminal law also includes provisions for the rehabilitation of offenders. This can take many forms, such as drug treatment or community service. The goal of rehabilitation is to help offenders reintegrate into society and reduce their likelihood of committing future crimes.

Criminal Law
Unsplash

Statutes of Limitation

There are certain crimes where the statute of limitations does not apply. For example, if the crime is punishable by death or life imprisonment, there is no statute of limitations. Other crimes exempt from statutes of limitations include first-degree murder, kidnapping, forcible rape, and felony sexual assault.

In general, the statute of limitations for a felony is three to seven years, depending on the state. For a misdemeanor, the statute of limitations is one to three years. The time starts running when the crime is committed. If the criminal cannot be tried within that time frame, then he or she can no longer be tried for that particular crime.

There are some exceptions to this rule. For example, if new evidence surfaces or if the victim files a civil lawsuit against the perpetrator, then the clock may start ticking again on the statute of limitations. In addition, if the criminal leaves the state where the crime was committed, the clock may pause until he or she returns to that state.

If you have been charged with a crime, it is important to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney who can advise you of the applicable statutes of limitations and help you build a strong defense against the charges.

Elements of a Crime

The essential elements of a crime are:
1: Actus Reus (the physical act)
2: Mens Rea (the mental state)
3: Causation (the causal link between the act and the result)
4: Concurrence (of the act and the mental state)
5: Harm (the result of the criminal act)

In order to be found guilty of a crime, the prosecution must prove each of these elements beyond a reasonable doubt. If even one element is not proven, then the defendant cannot be convicted.

The first element is actus reus, which is the Latin term for “guilty act.” This refers to the physical act that was committed by the defendant. It can be anything from an action, like punching someone, to an omission, like failing to pay taxes. As long as there was some kind of action or inaction, it can be considered an actus reus.

The second element is mens rea, which is Latin for “guilty mind.” This refers to the mental state of the defendant at the time that they committed the act. In order for someone to be found guilty, they must have intended to commit the act. If they did not mean to do it, then they cannot be held criminally liable. For example, if someone punches another person in anger, they can be charged with assault because they intended to cause harm. However, if someone punches another person in self-defense, they cannot be charged with assault because they did not intend to cause harm.

The third element is causation, which is the link between the act and the result. In order for there to be a crime, there must be a causal connection between the act and the result. For example, if someone punches another person and they die as a result, then the punch is the cause of death and the person can be charged with homicide.

However, if someone punches another person and they do not die, then there is no causal connection between the act and the result and the person cannot be charged with homicide.

The fourth element is concurrence, which is the simultaneous occurrence of the actus reus and mens rea. In order for someone to be guilty of a crime, both the physical act and the mental state must be present. For example, if someone intends to kill another person but does not actually commit any physical acts, then they cannot be charged with murder because there was no actus reus.

Similarly, if someone accidentally kills another person but did not intend to do so, then they cannot be charged with murder because there was no mens rea.

Criminal Law
Unsplash

Defenses to Criminal Law Charges

There are a number of defenses that can be raised in response to criminal charges. The most common defenses include self-defense, necessity, and duress.

Self-defense is a defense to criminal charges that argues that the defendant used force in order to protect themselves from harm. In order for this defense to be successful, the defendant must have reasonably believed that they were in danger of being harmed and that the use of force was necessary to protect themselves.

Necessity is a defense that argues that the defendant committed a crime because it was necessary to prevent a greater harm from occurring. In order for this defense to be successful, the defendant must have reasonably believed that their actions were necessary to prevent harm and that the harm they were preventing was greater than the harm caused by their actions.

Duress is a defense that argues that the defendant committed a crime because they were forced to do so by another person. In order for this defense to be successful, the defendant must have reasonably believed that they would be harmed if they did not commit the crime and that they had no other way to escape the situation.

What is a Crime?

When we think of the word “crime,” images of violence, gangs, and drugs usually come to mind. But what is a crime, really? A crime is defined as an act that is punishable by law. There are two types of crimes: misdemeanors and felonies. Misdemeanors are less serious offenses that carry a smaller punishment, such as a fine or short jail sentence. Felonies are more serious offenses that carry a heavier punishment, such as a long prison sentence.

There are many different types of crimes, but some of the most common include: assault, burglary, DUI, larceny, murder, rape, and theft. Crimes can be classified as violent or non-violent. Violent crimes involve physical force or the threat of physical force against another person. Non-violent crimes typically involve property damage or financial crimes.

While the consequences for committing a crime vary depending on the severity of the offense and the state in which it was committed, all criminals face potential penalties including jail time, probation, and fines. In some cases, criminals may also be required to complete community service or attend counseling sessions.

Criminal Law
Unsplash

The Difference Between Felonies and Misdemeanors

When it comes to criminal law, there are two main types of offenses: felonies and misdemeanors. Both felonies and misdemeanors are punishable by jail time, but felonies are much more serious than misdemeanors.

Felonies are typically defined as crimes that are punishable by more than one year in prison. Some examples of felonies include murder, rape, robbery, and arson. Misdemeanors, on the other hand, are typically less serious crimes that are punishable by up to one year in prison. Examples of misdemeanors include petty theft, trespassing, and simple assault.

The main difference between felonies and misdemeanors is the severity of the punishment. Felonies are much more serious crimes that carry heavier penalties, while misdemeanors are less serious crimes that carry lighter penalties.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

eighty two  −  seventy four  =